laundry
  • Best of Year 2015
  • Editors' Choice
Expert Score
8.6

Whirlpool Cabrio WED7300DW Dryer Review

In a world of mega-capacity dryers, this regular-sized Whirlpool stands out.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
March 25, 2015
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Sometimes, bigger isn’t always better. Such was the case with Whirlpool's new 7.0 cu. ft. Cabrio WED7300DW (MSRP $899) electric dryer, and its larger sibling, the Cabrio WED8500DC.

When we tested the 8.8-cu.-ft. WED8500DC, the first Whirlpool to feature the company's new, intuitive touch controls, we were underwhelmed. Sure, this $1,100 dryer was good, but a fancy new interface didn't seem worth the premium price.

The 7300, on the other hand, dries exceptionally well, offers a steam dry function, and is available for an average sale price of just $720. Those touch controls seem a lot more appealing when combined with great drying performance and a low price.

Design & Usability

Old school dryer, new school controls

Whirlpool Cabrio WED7300DW Front
Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
If it weren't for the fancy controls, this would be a very basic budget dryer. View Larger

Take away Whirlpool’s innovative interface, and you’re left with a fairly basic appliance. The WED7300DW's glossy white exterior won’t catch anyone by surprise, nor will the matching white drum. (For this price, the lack of a stainless interior isn’t surprising.)

The new control scheme, however, makes this machine feel a lot more high-tech. The touchscreen controls are designed to take the guesswork out of laundry. Going from left to right, you first pick what kind of clothing you’re drying, and then how you want it dried. Settings are still customizable, but hands-off users will appreciate the streamlined nature of this interface.

That said, we found the touch-sensitive console less responsive than regular buttons, plus the glossy black surface was easily smudged. While this control scheme still has the potential to improve your laundry experience, the technology isn't perfect.

Despite the fancy controls, Whirlpool also opted to use an old-fashioned, pull-out lint trap, found on top of the dryer. It works well enough, but compared to lint screens inside the drum, the pull-out variety tends to release more lint into the air when you try to clean it. It’s not a deal-breaker, just something to be aware of.

Advertisement - Continue Reading Below

Performance & Features

Dry clothes, despite the controls

Despite the nonstandard controls, we were still able to conduct our key tests, which focus on the Normal, Delicate, Quick, and Bulky cycles. Each test we ran with this Whirlpool produced wearable clothing within a reasonable time frame, and did so using appropriate levels of heat.

Whirlpool Cabrio WED7300DW Cycles
Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
Whirlpool's new control panel is designed to take the guesswork out of which cycle you should be using. View Larger

Our only quibble is Whirlpool’s cycle breakdown, which essentially removes a designated Quick cycle from the available repertoire (we used a shortened Timed Dry for our test). Folks we talked to at Whirlpool explained that the dryer’s sensors should shorten a cycle to accommodate the size of your laundry pile, but if you only have 20 minutes to get your clothes dry, the simplified controls suddenly become a lot more complex.

Whirlpool Cabrio WED7300DW Controls.
Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
The "How To Dry" section of the controls tries to help you intuit what heat level you should be using to dry your clothes. View Larger
Whirlpool Cabrio WED7300DW Sensors
Credit: Reviewed.com / Matthew Zahnzinger
These sensors seem securely installed, never once tearing our test materials. View Larger

Features-wise, the WED7300DW has a limited, but solid lineup. Most notable is a water hookup that lets you produce steam inside the drum, which helps remove wrinkles and funky smells. There's also a Wrinkle Shield feature, which can be used in conjunction with steam. You’ve also got Static Reduce mode, and a Damp Beep alert in case you want to line dry your damp clothes.

It’s not a feature, exactly, but we also want to address an improvement we’ve noticed in this model. On some of the other new Whirlpool dryers, there were two visible temperature sensors in the back of the drum. These sensors would catch our test items, snagging threads and making us wary of drying anything delicate or easily torn. Fortunately, Whirlpool corrected this issue, and we didn’t notice any torn threads or other evidence of clothing damage during our eight-cycle testing procedure.

For in-depth performance information, please visit the Science Page.

A Good Bargain

A small dryer that delivers big.

Lots of manufacturers tout the ever-expanding drums of their newest washers and dryers. However, the Whirlpool Cabrio WED7300DW makes a strong case for capability over capacity. Nearly flawless drying is already the best perk of all, but it’s made even more appealing by a low in-store price of just about $720.

If you're a fan of its control scheme, want a steam dry option, and don't want to pay a lot for an effective dryer, the WED7300DW is an excellent choice.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Advertisement - Continue Reading Below
Compare Prices
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

What's Your Take?

All Comments