Tested by experts
laundry

Asko W6424 Review

Though it retails for $1299, the W6424 is still one of Asko’s least expensive units.

$1,349.00
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Introduction

Asko is a Swedish company best known in the US for its high-end washers, dryers, and dishwashers. Though it retails for $1299, the W6424 is still one of Asko’s least expensive units, and competes against other compact, stackable European-style washing machines from Bosch and Miele.

Designed to be installed in a kitchen, the W6424 is an extremely stylish machine, although its user interface suffers as a result. And despite a price that’s at least twice as much as washers from other manufacturers, its performance doesn’t offer any compelling reason for a consumer to pay so much. It’s not a bad washer, but it’s not a very good value, either.

Design & Usability

The Asko W6424 emphasizes style over substance.

Outside of the US, it’s common to have a washing machine in the kitchen, which explains why the W6424 is so good looking. Tiny controls are about form, not function, and the electronically-operated door is a real pain. Unfortunately, the Asko W6424's small door means that it's pretty hard to load laundry, too.

The W6424 runs on a 220V current.

Fitting in a standard eight-pound load requires some maneuvering, which we found frustrating. Washing a larger load would be almost impossible. It’s also important to note that the W6424 runs on a 220V current and features a special plug that’s designed to fit into a compatible Asko dryer. Unless you’re an electrician, you’ll need a dryer and a 220V outlet nearby.

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Performance & Features

All cycles take a while to complete, and cleaning performance is only slightly above average.

Other washers not only do a better job cleaning clothes, but they cost less money and take half the time.

The Asko proved to be moderately disappointing. Other washers not only do a better job cleaning clothes, but they cost less money and take half the time. Per the owner's manual, we used the "Auto" cycle for a normal clothes wash. It took over two hours to complete, though it got clothes extremely clean. By comparison, other washers we've tested have offered up similar results in under an hour. If you don't have that kind of time, we'd recommend using the Perma Press or even Quick cycle for most normally soiled laundry loads. For more soiled loads, the Heavy/White cycle may be more productive. It may have taken nearly two and a half hours, but it was the best our Asko had to offer.

On the features front, we were especially impressed by the Asko W6424’s temperature options, which range from tap-cold water to a 205ºF sanitizing cycle. Unlike many other washers we’ve tested, the Asko’s promised temperatures matched what we observed.

Comparable Products

Before you buy the Asko W6424, take a look at these other washing machines.

Conclusion

The Asko W6424 may be attractive enough to install in a kitchen, but its wash performance didn't match its good looks.

There are many other washers on the market to choose from that will get your clothes just as clean.

Though one would expect a washer that sells for $1299 to deliver quick, effective cycles, the Asko took twice as long to get stains out no better than washers that cost half as much. In addition to its Scandinavian design, we were impressed by the W6424's energy efficiency, but again, the cost savings per wash could never make up for Asko's price premium.

About the only thing low-cost about this appliance is how much you'll pay per wash. Thanks to an internal water heater, the Asko only draws cold water, though it can bring it up to as warm as 205ºF. But $1299 is a lot of money to spend on a washer. Unless you value appearances over results, there are many other washers on the market to choose from that will get your clothes just as clean, leaving your bank account unscathed.

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