laundry
Expert Score
5.9

Whirlpool WED5000DW Dryer Review

It dries clothes... and that's about it.

December 17, 2014
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Most of today's new dryers are pretty darn fancy. Die-hard, old-school consumers who don’t want all those newfangled, high-tech options might feel a bit overwhelmed by the specialized cycles and extra features. If you want a dryer that hearkens back to a simpler time, you might be interested in the Whirlpool WED5000DW (MSRP $649).

This hamper-style dryer comes with a crank timer, a surprisingly modern cycle list, and a sizable interior. Unfortunately, it also comes with lackluster drying performance, only one extra feature, and sensors that run the risk of ripping your clothes apart. While the swing-down hamper door might be appealing to some, we recommend you give this one a pass.

Design & Usability

Whirlpool WED5000DW Front
A basic hamper dryer for old-school consumers. View Larger

Hamper door!

For a low-tech dryer, this Whirlpool actually has a passable sense of style. It's primarily a big white box, but the gray control panels add some pizzazz. The long, pullout lint trap is definitely an old-school feature. While the trap itself was somewhat unwieldy to push in and pull out, it was nevertheless easy to clean.

The hamper door is a nice touch, and one that’s not often seen anymore. It’s useful if you’re the kind of person who likes folding laundry right out of the dryer, but hates bending down to put things in a basket on the floor.

Unfortunately, there’s a catch... literally. The door latch is located in the middle of the upper doorframe. While running our tests, we would set our laundry basket on the hamper door, and simply tilt the laundry in. Every single time, at least one article of clothing got caught on this latch. If the material had been thinner or more delicate, it could've easily ripped.

Even if your clothing makes it into the dryer unscathed, the danger isn’t over yet. The two moisture sensors found at the back of the white drum—they look like two strips of metal, sort of like the security sensors you find inside DVD cases—ripped strands of fabric out of our towels and other test materials.

Whirlpool says they've noticed this issue, and the company is now installing a plastic cover over the sensors. We got an early unit in our labs, and newer versions of the dryer may not have this problem.

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Performance & Features

So much heat...

Don’t expect delicacy from this powerful little machine. Every single cycle that we tested was too hot—including Delicates, which peaked at a whopping 154.4°F. Not exactly "delicate...," most machines barely crack 100°F during this cycle.

The overheated cycles resulted in dry clothes every time, but excess warmth can be bad for clothing. Cycle times weren’t any shorter than average, so it’s not like the heat was taking the place of extra tumbling.

Whirlpool WED5000DW Sensor Shreds
Careful—the sensors in the back of the drum caught on our test clothes and started to rip threads apart. View Larger

That said, high heat and average cycle times turned out one of the best Bulky tests we’ve ever run. After about 72 minutes, our test comforter came out almost completely dry. If you’re primarily drying large blankets, comforters, rugs, or other thick and heavy items, you might not want to rule this Whirlpool out entirely.

You actually get a range of five sensor cycles, in addition to a Timed Dry that can run up to about 70 minutes. The crank timer means cycle selection is imprecise, so there’s always a little bit of guesswork involved. You can also pair any of these cycles with one of five temperature settings, including an Air Only option.

Extra features are mighty slim. All you get is a Wrinkle Shield that will tumble clothes for up to 90 minutes at the end of a cycle, as well as the option to turn off the dryer’s loud cycle completion signal.

For in-depth performance information, please visit the Science Page.

Barebones Drying

Whirlpool WED5000DW Interior
The interior is the same as other dryers; the hamper-style entry point is what's unusual. View Larger

It’s simple, that's for sure

If you just want something that will dry clothes, the Whirlpool WED5000DW may seem appealing. It’s easy to use, with enough cycles to give the user a small sense of control. The price is great, too: Retailers offer it up for a mere $535.

It isn't our test results that keep us from recommending this dryer: Two points of contact—the door latch and the rear drum sensors—can shred your clothes. If you’re looking for a low-cost, low-frills dryer that should take better care of your laundry, consider the Hotpoint HTDP120EDWW, which is easily found for less than $400.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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